Sex on Wheels

1988 Honda Shadow. Not much else to say about this beauty. From Dime City Cycles. Drool.

1988 Honda Shadow

Meet The Author


Tanner is the founder and primary author of Masculine Style. He lives in Salt Lake City, Utah with his wife and two kids, and helps run Beckett & Robb - a men's clothing company built around custom suits and shirts.
  • I’ve gotta get me one of these. Of course, I’ve gotta learn how to ride one first.

    • They’re easier to ride than you think. Just a couple weeks and you’ll be solid. You still owe me some pictures by the way.

      • Did you want them? I didn’t see your response on that post. I’ll hopefully have them to you early next week (assuming I can get my photographer to free up her schedule).

        • Ya I still want them. Send them over when you can.

  • Peregrine John

    So how much does one of these lovelies run? I’ve been pondering more of a cruiser style, and the Yamaha VStar is oddly affordable for its good looks.

    • These cafe bikes are hard to pin down price-wise. Having someone like Dime City build one of these will run you upwards of ten grand. That being said, I have a ’73 Honda that I found in great shape for $800 and will probably have looking and running exactly how I want it at around three grand. Half the appeal of bikes like this is the customization that you put into it yourself.

      I have a buddy who has a VStar and loves it.

  • Michael

    I paid $500 for my Honda Dream 305, but that was back in ’81.

    http://www.classicmotorcycles.org.uk/bikemuseum/images/honda/honda_1965_cb77_superhawk_305cc.jpg

  • Travis

    I have a mid-80s Honda Shadow myself, and I can say a few things. Like: What did they do to the exhaust? Or the battery? Or the airbox?

    The bike looks great, make no mistake, but stuff like this makes me worry about the functionality.

    And with older, classic bikes – stuff from the mid-70s and earlier – I tend to prefer the ‘properly restored’ look to the mangled bobber and cafe racer style.

    • Usually these cafes have the battery moved underneath the new seat pan – they hide it in that rear bubble. They also will typically replace the airbox with cone or pod filters. Not ideal for the rain but still entirely functional.